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About VLIC

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About VLIC

In the early 1980′s, two Texas MBA students yearned for a business school activity as challenging and prestigious as “moot court” in law school. They envisioned a competition in which MBAs working in teams would conceive an idea for a new business, develop the idea in a written business plan, and present the plan to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, accountants and lawyers.

In 1984 this vision was fulfilled when the Graduate School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin held its inaugural Venture Labs Investment Competition (VLIC). It was the first competition of its kind for MBA students and is still considered the most prestigious in the world. VLIC has been crowned “the Super Bowl of world business plan competition.” More than half of the teams that compete in VLIC are from outside the United States.

With aspiring entrepreneurs soliciting start-up funds from experienced investors, the VLIC simulates the real-world process of raising venture capital. MBAs from business schools around the globe come to The University of Texas at Austin each May to present their business plans to panels of investors. From among myriad offerings is selected the best new-venture opportunity. With a more than 32-year history, the Competition was the oldest operating inter-business school competition in the world. 

On October 6, 2015, the McCombs School of Business announced that it had ended the global version of its student startup investment competition.Current competition organizer and director of the Jon Brumley Texas Venture Labs (TVL), Rob Adams explained that the global competition was no longer necessary since many schools and regions now have their own competitions. In addition, students can be better served with a stronger focus on Texas startups and the many great investor-ready ideas coming out of The University of Texas at Austin.

History

"The Super Bowl of World Business-Plan Competition"  Business Week, 1993
"The Mother of All Business-Plan Competitions" Success, 1997
"The Granddaddy of Them All" Red Herring, 2000
"The Rose Bowl of business-plan competitions" Inc., 2004

With entrepreneurs soliciting start-up funds from investors, the Moot Corp Competition simulates the real-world process of raising venture capital. MBAs from business schools around the globe come to The University of Texas at Austin each May to present their business plans to panels of investors. From among myriad offerings is selected the best new-venture opportunity. Founded in 1984, the Moot Corp Competition is both the first and longest operating, inter-business school, new-venture competition in the world.

The Early Years

In the early 1980s, two Texas MBA students, Steven A. Mailman and Barbara Oppenheimer, yearned for a business school activity as challenging and prestigious as “moot court” in law school. They envisioned a competition in which MBAs could conceive an idea for a new business, develop the idea into a business plan, and present the plan to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, accountants and lawyers. Their idea was not enthusiastically received in all quarters. The Dean of the Texas Business School at that time was concerned that the Moot Corp Program would divert external funds from his favored projects. But a faculty committee voted by a narrow margin to approve the launch of this program. The competition’s inauguration in 1984 involved only UT MBAs and was shepherded by Professor Kenneth E. Knight during this critical phase.

National to International

In 1989 Moot Corp Program held its first national competition. MBA teams from Harvard, Wharton, Carnegie Mellon, Michigan and Purdue joined Texas in the competition. The following year Dr. Smilor invited three prestigious business schools from outside the United States to participate, resulting in the London Business School, Lyon Graduate School of Business (France), and Bond University’s (Australia) participation. Approximately the same cast of universities competed in 1991 and 1992.

Going Global and Increasing Impact

Gary M. Cadenhead succeeded Ray Smilor as director of the Moot Corp program in 1992, and has transformed it into a global program. To have a greater impact on both UT Austin’s entrepreneurship program reputation and education, the scope of participating universities had to grow.

The initial American strategy had been to invite only universities with top-twenty MBA programs. This strategy had two shortcomings: it excluded universities with outstanding entrepreneurship programs in lower-ranked business schools; and it excluded MBAs from unranked schools who might have outstanding new venture proposals.

The first of these deficiencies was overcome by including top-ten entrepreneurship programs in the invitational set. And now, by inviting winners of other new venture competitions to participate, the second concern has been put to rest as well.

The number of MBA new venture competitions in the United States has continued to grow. Not long after the establishment of the Moot Corp Competition, the University of Nebraska - Lincoln began its own contest in 1989, followed by San Diego State University in 1990 and the University of Georgia in 1991. The winner of these and other competitions are invited to the Moot Corp Competition. Intra-business school competitions have also recently been introduced at such prestigious institutions as the Kellogg School, the University of Chicago and the Harvard Business School, and MIT has a university-wide competition instituted nearly ten years ago.

Further global expansion involved licensing the Moot Corp name to prestigious universities all over the world so that they could hold regional competitions. The Chinese University of Hong Kong held the first Asian Moot Corp Competition in 1998. Business schools in Asia, representing China, Hong Kong, India, Korea, Singapore, Philippines, Taiwan and Thailand, now compete every March.

The first Australian Moot Corp Competition began in 1999, and it now includes teams not only from Australia, but also other Pacific Rim countries. In 2000, the Ivey Graduate School of Business at the University of Western Ontario launched the first Canadian Moot Corp Competition. The first African Moot Corp Competition was also held in 2000. The inaugural Latin American Moot Corp Competition was held in 2001 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and hosted by Fundacao Getulio Vargas.

The expansion strategy has succeeded. Thirty universities now send teams to Austin to compete in the Moot Corp Competition and many more are eager to participate. In addition, the international success of Moot Corp Competitions has contributed to the prestige of the McCombs School of Business’s entrepreneurship program and to its ranking. A recent entrepreneurship program ranking by Success specifically listed the Moot Corp Competition under its “Wow Factor” for the McCombs School of Business.

No Longer Moot

In the early years, the Competition was truly moot in terms of real world application. The process was strictly an academic exercise. However, many of the participating MBAs went on to work for or start their own businesses and became successful entrepreneurs; but, they did not “ride the horse” they had written about in their business plans.Then MBAs started converting their classroom creations into real-life enterprises. Since 1993, the team winning the annual competition for UT MBAs has moved into the Austin Technology Incubator and launched its venture. Teams are launching businesses each year. Similarly, MBAs from around the world participating in the Moot Corp Competition are increasingly likely to launch their ventures.

Unexpected & Planned Funding

Since 1997, the Moot Corp Competition has been held in conjunction with the Texas Venture Capital Conference, sponsored by The Capital Network, a not-for-profit investor network created by the IC2 Institute of UT. At this Conference, 25 entrepreneurs have ten minutes each to showcase their companies to the over 500 venture capitalists in the Four Seasons Hotel ballroom. Because the Texas Venture Capital Conference is held the day before the Moot Corp Competition begins, Moot Corp participants can observe entrepreneurs pitching what they themselves will simulate. The MBAs have an opportunity to interact directly with investors at the Conference’s closing reception, where each Moot Corp team has a table to display its production. Scheduling the Conference and the Competition back-to-back facilitates some of the venture capitalists’ staying on as judges for the Moot Corp Competition.

In 1999, for the first time, several teams received funding from one or more of the judges. These investments were brokered outside of the formal process of the Competition. With increasing numbers of MBAs intending to launch their ventures and more of the judges emerging from the venture capital community, it is increasingly likely that more teams will find backing for their dreams as a result of having participated in the Competition.

The Moot Corp Pontoon Fund was founded in 2001 to provide early stage bridge loans of $100,000 to the Global Champions in order to give the entrepreneurs financing while they are raising capital. The loans are convertible into equity at the same price as negotiated with the initial venture capital investment. In addition to the goal of facilitating the launch of the winning venture, another goal is to endow the Moot Corp Program through capital gains from the Fund.

The Spiral Factor

In the final round of the Moot Corp Competitions, both the finalists' presentations and their question and answer sessions with the judges are videotaped. The winning team’s video and business plan, along with appropriate instructional materials, are packaged into a “new venture module” which becomes a teaching case for the following year’s competitors. In effect, this top-notch business plan becomes the benchmark for the following year: expertise accrues and the achievement level is constantly rising. This unique spiral factor has worldwide impact, as all participating schools have access to the modules and strong motivation to incorporate their lessons into subsequent entrepreneurship courses.

The Moot Corp Program: Exploring the Frontier

Entrepreneurs around the world are exploring new economic frontiers and creating the future. They are riding innovation into the 21st century, creating wealth and jobs in the process, while meeting the ever-changing and expanding needs of consumers. Entrepreneurship represents a paradigm shift in business activity as we enter the new millennium.

This shift is having a profound impact on the corporate world as corporations downsize, reorganize and reengineer to stay competitive. Our best-managed corporations use the entrepreneurial model to enter new markets, invigorate their organizations, commercialize emerging technologies and continue to grow.

Similarly, business education based on functional approaches and taught by specialists is increasingly insulated from market forces. Our best MBA programs infuse entrepreneurship throughout their core curricula and recognize that entrepreneurship should become a major focus of business education.

MBA students recognize the value added to their education by this new focus. Students have been electing entrepreneurship courses in overwhelming numbers. A major question facing business schools today is how best to shift entrepreneurship from a peripheral activity into the center and infuse entrepreneurial thinking into the core of MBA education. Business plan competitions, stimulated by strong student demand, are one response to this challenge. But why has the popularity of business plan competitions continued to grow?

Business school educators and education as a whole have become increasingly specialized. Even the traditional integrative course, business policy or strategy, has become a functional one. Entrepreneurship courses in general and business plan courses in particular now demonstrate the quintessential process for integrating the MBA experience. Here MBAs have the opportunity to apply knowledge assimilated and methodologies drilled in other business courses and they are pressed to cobble together a successful new venture. The case method clearly surpasses lecturing as a technique for imparting entrepreneurial skills to MBAs. Writing business plans provides another, parallel process and offers analytical depth. At last, we have a teaching and learning methodology that facilitates MBAs’ focus, study and effort, integrating functional knowledge and performing in-depth analyses, to give wings to their entrepreneurial dreams.

New Name and Focus

The Moot Corp process is a dynamic one that enables the sharing of new venture proposals among entrepreneurs. This approach is instrumental in the continuous improvement of entrepreneurship education. Although still a young institution, the Moot Corp Program is on a global trajectory to entrepreneurial excellence. In 2010, the Moot Corp Competition  changed its name to the Venture Labs Investment Competition and repositioned itself as “The Super Bowl of Investment Competition.” We will continue to use our former name, Moot Corp, as part of our tagline for the foreseeable future.

Rob Adams, director of the Venture Labs Investment Competition, explained the renaming as “reflective of the true nature of what Moot Corp had turned into, a forum where MBAs from around the world launch their ventures by raising capital. This competition is far from moot, and parallels the real-world process and realities of developing and launching a venture backed company. This renaming and repositioning aligns the competition with that mission.”

End of An Era

On October 6, 2015, the McCombs School of Business announced that it had ended the global version of its student startup investment competition.Current competition organizer and director of the Jon Brumley Texas Venture Labs (TVL), Rob Adams explained that the global competition was no longer necessary since many schools and regions now have their own competitions. In addition, students can be better served with a stronger focus on Texas startups and the many great investor-ready ideas coming out of The University of Texas at Austin.

 

Past Winners

Spring 2016 – QuickPlan Solutions

QuickPlan Solutions is a software company that has developed a digital mapping software to facilitate construction planning, scheduling, pulling materials on to project sites, and management of assets in order to improve efficiency and productivity. Matthew Mato, MSTC ’16; Mark McKenzie, MSTC ’16; Saikiran Kolla, MSTC ’16; Olu Kole-James, MSTC ’16.

2015 – Flipped Health

Flipped Health is developing AriVax™, a drug delivery platform that improves vaccine stability, reduces vaccine wastage and enables delivery to high growth emerging markets that can’t meet temperature-controlled supply chain (cold chain) requirements.
Cheryl Tulkoff, MSTC '15; Elizabeth Shumpert, MSTC '15; Israel Ortiz, MSTC '15; Brandon Shakley, MSTC '15; Daniel Cloud, MSTC '15

2014 – WiseWear 

WiseWear® Corporation is an Austin, Texas-based technology company that develops wearable monitoring devices for fitness, personalized medicine and mHealth applications.
Lisa Corless, MBA ‘14

2013 – Seismos

Seismos is a technology enabled services company that detects and interprets changes in underground oil and gas reservoirs in real time with unparalleled sensitivity.
Devin Bedwell, MSTC ’13, Panos Adamopoulos, MSTC ’13, Steven Slusher, MSTC ’13

2012 – eyeQ

eyeQ provides retailers the ability to monitor consumer purchasing behavior, generate retail business intelligence and influence consumer purchasing at the shelf.  Our solution utilizes algorithms based on video analytics to create consumer data for the retailer and provide the customer with a content rich buying experience.  
Michael Garel, MBA 2012; Harish Jayakumar, MBA 2012 

2011 – Vocal Media

Vocal Media is an advertising media venture with a low-end disruption to traditional advertising media that is designed to target hard-to-reach, ethnic immigrant populations living in America.  
David Saldana, MSTC 2011; Arely Fontecha, MSTC 2011; Marty McCrea, MSTC 2011; Justin Dickstein, MSTC 2011

2010 – Solavicta

Solavicta is developing a solar technology that can be manufactured for less than $0.50 per watt. This will allow the creation of fully-installed, grid-ready power systems for 25% less than the leading utility-scale solar power technologies. 
David McParland, MBA 2010; Franklin Fuchs, MBA 2010

2009 – FocalPop

FocalPop is a web-based platform that allows companies to finally get the exact photo that they need by allowing them to crowdsource their image requests via a community of photographers across the world.
Brian Romanko, MBA 2008; Becky Parker, MBA 2009; Ronnie LeBert, MBA 2009; 
Eddie Howard, MBA 2009; Libby Essinger, MBA 2009

2008 – Qcue

Qcue is the premier software-based dynamic pricing solution on the market today helping sports teams, venues, promoters, and ticketing organizations set better up-front prices, and adjust to shifting demand, changes in market conditions and real-time sales data. 
Barry Kahn, PhD Economics 2007; Jitendra Dalvi, MBA 2007; Andrew Mills, PhD Computer Science 2008

2007 – MacuCLEAR

MacuCLEAR Inc.™ is a specialty clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on discovering and developing novel solutions for vascular disorders of the eye. 
Douglas Baum, MSSTC 2007; Christopher R. Aniszczyk, MSSTC 2007

2006 – Phurnace Software

Phurnace Software is a leading developer of automation software that significantly reduces the cost, complexity and risk to deploy and configure Java-based applications on physical, virtual and cloud environments. The company was acquired by BMC Software in 2010.
Daniel Nelson, MBA 2006

2005 – Bigfoot Networks

Bigfoot Networks delivers the fastest, most intelligent networking solutions designed to improve the way people enjoy the Internet. The Company’s hardware and software products deliver a smooth, uninterrupted consumer experience for online games, streaming HD video and real-time communications. Bigfoot was acquired by Qualcomm in 2011.
Harlan Beverly, MBA 2004; Mike Cubbage, MBA 2005; Bob Grim, MBA 2005

2004 – Chipotle Business Group

Chipotle Business Group, Inc. is a global solutions provider. Be it famine, poor sanitation, natural disaster, or other worldwide problem, CBGI seeks to find innovative solutions by bringing together cutting edge technologies, state, national and international agencies/organizations, and best-in-class researchers, developers, and service providers.
Sridhar Pushpavanam, MBA 2004;  Jim Farrell,MBA 2004; Joe Zirnhelt, MBA 2004; Tracey Ayre, MBA 2004;Scott Evans, MBA 2004

2003 – Organic Energy Systems

Organic Energy Systems converts organic material into natural gas used to power environmentally friendly energy systems.
Tamara Young, Andy Rose, Ted Calvin

2002 – Private Concepts

Private Concepts provides safe, affordable, home diagnostic medical tests for women. The company's initial product is a self-administered cervical cancer screen.
Pat Pevoto, Andy Campbell, Niki Aberle, Lynn Wright, Tim Wilson

2001 – Halsa Pharmaceuticals

Halsa Pharmaceuticals is a biotechnology company developing therapeutics for the treatment of obesity, diabetes, cachexia and other metabolic diseases.
Phil Speros, Denise Bynum, Kristen Etheredge, James Clyde

2000 – BackTrack Solutions

BackTrack manages the receipt, handling and  resale of returned merchandise for multi-channel and e-commerce retailers. 
Jason Sears, Esther Schuller, Brian Graybill, Shawn Sullivan, Frank Mastronnuzi

1999 – Vusion, Inc.

Kent Bradshaw, Richard Burgess, Paul Kunko, Jason Levin

1998 – Isochron Data, LLC

Isochron Data has developed wireless technologies that allow companies to monitor and gather data from their vending machines on a real-time basis.
Erin DeFosse, Aruni Gunasegaram, Rhett Keisler

1997 - BioGel, Inc.

BioGel offers a product which will reduce the risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.
Barry Baker, Chris Hegeman, Dave Hendrix, Lauranne Labiosa

1996 - Easy Learning Technology

Joe Wiseman, Marc Hite, Haluk Elci, Stephanie Carr, Carolyn Faour, Desmond Davis

1995 - True Dimensions, Inc.

True Dimensions will manufacture and market an ergonomically advanced office chair.
Jeff Hoogendam, Mike Hanratty, Irene Bond, Wes Boyd

1994 - Zeoponics, Inc.

Kevin Williams, Clay Williams, Scott Uhrig, Brad Dunn, Jordan Silber

1993 - Ampersand Art Supply, Inc.

In 1994, Ampersand Art Supply began reviving the time-honored tradition of panel painting with the creation of Claybord™, their first coated painting panel. Over the years, Ampersand has added many painting panels with unique surface coatings and profiles suitable for all media from oils to pastels.
Elaine Salazar, Kathy Henderson, Dave Shackleton, Drew Tingleaf

1992 - Expert Application System, Inc.

Expert Application Systems, Incorporated (EASI) develops compliance software systems for growth markets. EASI's systems are designed to be extremely user-friendly, accurate, and portable among computer platforms. 
Patricia Mack, Debra Beard, Margarita Ash, Mark Cooper, J. Joseph Cooper

1991 - MBA Practice Management

Scott Collier, Larry Hanrahan, Mark Quigley, David Rogers

Fall 1989 - USAdboards

USAdboards designs advertising boards for restrooms of establishments like hotels, restaurants, movie theaters and airports.
Lars Baumgurtel, Paul Myhill, Mike Engleman, Chris Wilson, Greg Wolfe

Spring 1989 - Diamond Technologies, Inc.

Diamond Technologies' mission was to commercialize new diamond coating techniques developed for President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative.
Ricardo Barrientos, Paul Hudson, Don Lindgren, Bill Riley

1988 - Professional Greetings, Inc.

Natalie Robb, Christian Gerbail, Douglas Stuckey, Kevin Phelon

1987 - Mobile Mechanics

Brian Forbes, Steven Linder, John O’Shea, John Thomas

1986 - Liquid Piston Technologies

Jeff Malinak, Bill Phelps, Brian Wilson

1985 - The Hydrocarbon Recovery Co.

Duncan Butler, Patrick Clegg, Bradford Denning, Gene Shepperd

1984 - PolyPallet, Inc.

PolyPallet proposed to design, manufacture and market a pallet which combined both high and low density polyethylene into a single piece of injection-molded polyethylene.
Andrew Greenwell, Carolyn Loyd, Tom McCaffrey, Joe Williams

Page last updated: 9/24/2013